China Hot selling Medical Equipment Dental 140 L/Min Oil Free Air Compressor (ST-3EW) small air compressor

Product Description

                                                               

L Dental Air Compressor (ST-EW Series)
 

Specifications

ST-1EW
– Supply voltage: a.c.220 V, 50 Hz
– Electric current: 2.4 A
– Power: 545 VA
– Air flow: 70 L/min
– Star pressure: 0.5 MPa
– Capacity discharge: 0.8 MPa
– Noise level: 55 dB(A)
– Air container volume: 32 L
– Weight: 28 kg
– Dimensions (H*W*D): 460*460*690 mm (carton)

ST-2EW
– Supply voltage: a.c.220 V, 50 Hz
– Electric current: 3.7 A
– Power: 840 VA
– Air flow: 105 L/min
– Star pressure: 0.5 MPa
– Capacity discharge: 0.8 MPa
– Noise level: 58 dB(A)
– Air container volume: 38 L
– Weight: 30 kg
– Dimensions (H*W*D): 460*460*710 mm (carton)

ST-3EW
– Supply voltage: a.c.220 V, 50 Hz
– Electric current: 4.8 A
– Power: 1090 VA
– Air flow: 140 L/min
– Star pressure: 0.5 MPa
– Capacity discharge: 0.8 MPa
– Noise level: 65 dB(A)
– Air container volume: 60 L
– Weight: 66 kg
– Dimensions (H*W*D): 900*440*770 mm (wooden box)

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Packaging & Delivery
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Certification: ISO, CE
Air Flow: 140 L/Min
Air Container Volume: 60L
Lead Time: Within 7 Working Days
Warranty: 12 Months
Supply Voltage: AC 220V 50Hz
Samples:
US$ 450/Piece
1 Piece(Min.Order)

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Customization:
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air compressor

What are the differences between stationary and portable air compressors?

Stationary and portable air compressors are two common types of air compressors with distinct features and applications. Here are the key differences between them:

1. Mobility:

The primary difference between stationary and portable air compressors is their mobility. Stationary air compressors are designed to be permanently installed in a fixed location, such as a workshop or a factory. They are typically larger, heavier, and not easily movable. On the other hand, portable air compressors are smaller, lighter, and equipped with handles or wheels for easy transportation. They can be moved from one location to another, making them suitable for jobsites, construction sites, and other mobile applications.

2. Power Source:

Another difference lies in the power source used by stationary and portable air compressors. Stationary compressors are usually powered by electricity, as they are designed for continuous operation in a fixed location with access to power outlets. They are connected to the electrical grid or have dedicated wiring. In contrast, portable compressors are available in various power options, including electric, gasoline, and diesel engines. This versatility allows them to operate in remote areas or sites without readily available electricity.

3. Tank Capacity:

Tank capacity is also a distinguishing factor between stationary and portable air compressors. Stationary compressors often have larger storage tanks to store compressed air for extended periods. The larger tanks enable them to deliver a continuous and steady supply of compressed air for longer durations without the need for frequent cycling. Portable compressors, due to their compact size and portability, generally have smaller tank capacities, which may be sufficient for intermittent or smaller-scale applications.

4. Performance and Output:

The performance and output capabilities of stationary and portable air compressors can vary. Stationary compressors are typically designed for high-volume applications that require a consistent and continuous supply of compressed air. They often have higher horsepower ratings, larger motor sizes, and higher air delivery capacities. Portable compressors, while generally offering lower horsepower and air delivery compared to their stationary counterparts, are still capable of delivering sufficient air for a range of applications, including pneumatic tools, inflation tasks, and light-duty air-powered equipment.

5. Noise Level:

Noise level is an important consideration when comparing stationary and portable air compressors. Stationary compressors, being larger and built for industrial or commercial settings, are often equipped with noise-reducing features such as sound insulation and vibration dampening. They are designed to operate at lower noise levels, which is crucial for maintaining a comfortable working environment. Portable compressors, while efforts are made to reduce noise, may produce higher noise levels due to their compact size and portability.

6. Price and Cost:

Stationary and portable air compressors also differ in terms of price and cost. Stationary compressors are generally more expensive due to their larger size, higher power output, and industrial-grade construction. They often require professional installation and may involve additional costs such as electrical wiring and system setup. Portable compressors, being smaller and more versatile, tend to have a lower upfront cost. They are suitable for individual users, contractors, and small businesses with budget constraints or flexible air supply needs.

When selecting between stationary and portable air compressors, it is essential to consider the specific requirements of the intended application, such as mobility, power source availability, air demands, and noise considerations. Understanding these differences will help in choosing the appropriate type of air compressor for the intended use.

air compressor

How are air compressors utilized in pneumatic tools?

Air compressors play a crucial role in powering and operating pneumatic tools. Here’s a detailed explanation of how air compressors are utilized in pneumatic tools:

Power Source:

Pneumatic tools rely on compressed air as their power source. The air compressor generates and stores compressed air, which is then delivered to the pneumatic tool through a hose or piping system. The compressed air provides the force necessary for the tool to perform various tasks.

Air Pressure Regulation:

Air compressors are equipped with pressure regulation systems to control the output pressure of the compressed air. Different pneumatic tools require different air pressure levels to operate optimally. The air compressor’s pressure regulator allows users to adjust the output pressure according to the specific requirements of the pneumatic tool being used.

Air Volume and Flow:

Air compressors provide a continuous supply of compressed air, ensuring a consistent air volume and flow rate for pneumatic tools. The air volume is typically measured in cubic feet per minute (CFM) and determines the tool’s performance capabilities. Higher CFM ratings indicate that the pneumatic tool can deliver more power and operate at a faster rate.

Tool Actuation:

Pneumatic tools utilize compressed air to actuate their mechanical components. For example, an air-powered impact wrench uses compressed air to drive the tool’s internal hammer mechanism, generating high torque for fastening or loosening bolts and nuts. Similarly, air-powered drills, sanders, nail guns, and spray guns rely on compressed air to power their respective operations.

Versatility:

One of the significant advantages of pneumatic tools is their versatility, and air compressors enable this flexibility. A single air compressor can power a wide range of pneumatic tools, eliminating the need for separate power sources for each tool. This makes pneumatic tools a popular choice in various industries, such as automotive, construction, manufacturing, and woodworking.

Portability:

Air compressors come in different sizes and configurations, offering varying degrees of portability. Smaller portable air compressors are commonly used in applications where mobility is essential, such as construction sites or remote locations. The portability of air compressors allows pneumatic tools to be used in various work environments without the constraints of being tethered to a fixed power source.

Overall, air compressors are integral to the functionality and operation of pneumatic tools. They provide the necessary power, air pressure regulation, and continuous airflow required for pneumatic tools to perform a wide range of tasks efficiently and effectively.

air compressor

Can you explain the basics of air compressor terminology?

Understanding the basic terminology related to air compressors can help in better comprehension of their operation and discussions related to them. Here are some essential terms related to air compressors:

1. CFM (Cubic Feet per Minute): CFM is a unit of measurement that denotes the volumetric flow rate of compressed air. It indicates the amount of air a compressor can deliver within a minute and is a crucial factor in determining the compressor’s capacity.

2. PSI (Pounds per Square Inch): PSI is a unit of measurement used to quantify pressure. It represents the force exerted by the compressed air on a specific area. PSI is a vital specification for understanding the pressure capabilities of an air compressor and determining its suitability for various applications.

3. Duty Cycle: Duty cycle refers to the percentage of time an air compressor can operate in a given time period. It indicates the compressor’s ability to handle continuous operation without overheating or experiencing performance issues. For instance, a compressor with a 50% duty cycle can run for half the time in a given hour or cycle.

4. Horsepower (HP): Horsepower is a unit used to measure the power output of a compressor motor. It indicates the motor’s capacity to drive the compressor pump and is often used as a reference for comparing different compressor models.

5. Receiver Tank: The receiver tank, also known as an air tank, is a storage vessel that holds the compressed air delivered by the compressor. It helps in stabilizing pressure fluctuations, allowing for a more consistent supply of compressed air during peak demand periods.

6. Single-Stage vs. Two-Stage: These terms refer to the number of compression stages in a reciprocating air compressor. In a single-stage compressor, air is compressed in a single stroke of the piston, while in a two-stage compressor, it undergoes initial compression in one stage and further compression in a second stage, resulting in higher pressures.

7. Oil-Free vs. Oil-Lubricated: These terms describe the lubrication method used in air compressors. Oil-free compressors have internal components that do not require oil lubrication, making them suitable for applications where oil contamination is a concern. Oil-lubricated compressors use oil for lubrication, enhancing durability and performance but requiring regular oil changes and maintenance.

8. Pressure Switch: A pressure switch is an electrical component that automatically starts and stops the compressor motor based on the pre-set pressure levels. It helps maintain the desired pressure range in the receiver tank and protects the compressor from over-pressurization.

9. Regulator: A regulator is a device used to control and adjust the output pressure of the compressed air. It allows users to set the desired pressure level for specific applications and ensures a consistent and safe supply of compressed air.

These are some of the fundamental terms associated with air compressors. Familiarizing yourself with these terms will aid in understanding and effectively communicating about air compressors and their functionality.

China Hot selling Medical Equipment Dental 140 L/Min Oil Free Air Compressor (ST-3EW)   small air compressor China Hot selling Medical Equipment Dental 140 L/Min Oil Free Air Compressor (ST-3EW)   small air compressor
editor by CX 2023-10-04

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